Equity, Diversity and Inclusion

The Government of Canada is committed to ensuring that all trainees have equitable access to research funding and career support. Equity is an integral part of a sustainable research ecosystem as it encourages greater diversity among applicants. Studies show that diversity—of not only scientific expertise but also the people conducting and participating in the research—leads to more creativity and more innovation.

The Banting program strives to promote equity, diversity and inclusion throughout the application, review, and selection processes. To better equip all those participating in the Banting competition (applicants, host institutions, referees, reviewers and readers), the Tri-Agencies have curated an important list of resources to help guide each group.

For Applicants

Promoting equity, diversity and inclusion

Sex and Gender Based Analysis Plus (SGBA+) is the process by which we ensure sound equity, diversity and inclusion principles are applied to research design, methods, analysis and interpretation, and/or dissemination of research findings. In the context of research, SGBA+ is an analytical process used to systematically examine how differences in identity factors, such as sex, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age and mental or physical disability, affect the outcomes of research and the impacts of research findings. The purpose is to promote rigorous research that considers identity factors so that the results are impactful and relevant to the diversity of the population. Applicants must provide a strong rationale if they believe that no aspect of the proposed research’s design, methods, analysis and interpretation, and/or dissemination of findings should take SGBA+ into consideration.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to take the Status of Women Canada’s online Introduction to Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) course.

There is an increasing number of cited research examples that would have or have benefited from considering identity factors in the research design and process. A good source for such examples is CIHR’s “Impacts of integrating sex and gender in research” and the Stanford University Gendered Innovations project. These materials provide practical examples and methods for sex and gender considerations, in addition to other factors or variables that should be considered, such as biological, socio-cultural or psychological aspects of users, communities, customers, experimental subjects or cells. Research has demonstrated how not taking into consideration certain identity factors, such as race or age, can lead to failed research projects.

Resources

Research respectfully involving and engaging Indigenous communities

  • Tri-Council Policy Statement (TCPS 2), Chapter 9: Research Involving the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples of Canada
    • The Banting Postdoctoral Fellowships (PDF) program is committed to supporting research by and with Indigenous Peoples. For applications in which the proposed research respectfully involves and engages Indigenous communities, applicants and host institutions should be aware of and refer to the principles and protocols established for this type of research.
    • Applicants whose proposed research respectfully involves and engages Indigenous communities are asked to include “This research respectfully involves and engages Indigenous communities” at the beginning of the lay abstract. The program administrator for each selection committee (CIHR, NSERC, SSHRC) will endeavour to ensure that the primary or secondary reviewer on these applications has expertise in Indigenous research. Reviewers and readers will be asked to read and take into consideration the following:

Note: Research respectfully involving Indigenous communities is defined as research in any field or discipline that is:

  • conducted by First Nations, Inuit, Métis or other Indigenous nations, communities, societies or individuals; and/or
  • grounded in or engaged with one or more of these communities and/or their wisdom, cultures, experiences or knowledge systems, as expressed in their dynamic forms, past and present.

Examples include:

  • projects in which water samples are extracted from Indigenous lands in South America
  • analyses of educational policies pertaining to Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians
  • cross-sectional studies of how injuries sustained by different groups of people, including Inuit youth, are treated

Reducing unconscious bias

For Host Institutions

Reducing unconscious bias

Research respectfully involving and engaging and Indigenous communities

Note: Research respectfully involving Indigenous communities is defined as research in any field or discipline that is:

  • conducted by First Nations, Inuit, Métis or other Indigenous nations, communities, societies or individuals; and/or
  • grounded in or engaged with one or more of these communities and/or their wisdom, cultures, experiences or knowledge systems, as expressed in their dynamic forms, past and present.

Examples include:

  • projects in which water samples are extracted from Indigenous lands in South America
  • analyses of educational policies pertaining to Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians
  • cross-sectional studies of how injuries sustained by different groups of people, including Inuit youth, are treated

Promoting equity, diversity and inclusion

Sex and Gender Based Analysis Plus (SGBA+) is the process by which we ensure sound equity, diversity and inclusion principles are applied to research design, methods, analysis and interpretation, and/or dissemination of research findings. In the context of research, SGBA+ is an analytical process used to systematically examine how differences in identity factors, such as sex, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age and mental or physical disability, affect the outcomes of research and the impacts of research findings. The purpose is to promote rigorous research that considers identity factors so that the results are impactful and relevant to the diversity of the Canadian population. Applicants must provide a strong rationale if they believe that no aspect of the proposed research’s design, methods, analysis and interpretation, and/or dissemination of findings should take SGBA+ into consideration.

All stakeholders are encouraged to take the Status of Women Canada’s online Introduction to Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) course.

There is an increasing number of cited research examples that would have or have benefited from considering identity factors in the research design and process. A good source for such examples is CIHR’s “Impacts of integrating sex and gender in research” and the Stanford University Gendered Innovations project. These materials provide practical examples and methods for sex and gender considerations, in addition to other factors or variables that should be considered, such as biological, socio-cultural or psychological aspects of users, communities, customers, experimental subjects or cells. Research has demonstrated how not taking into consideration certain identity factors, such as race or age, can lead to failed research projects.

Resources

For Referees

Reducing unconscious bias

Research respectfully involving and engaging Indigenous communities

Note: Research respectfully involving Indigenous communities is defined as research in any field or discipline that is:

  • conducted by First Nations, Inuit, Métis or other Indigenous nations, communities, societies or individuals; and/or
  • grounded in or engaged with one or more of these communities and/or their wisdom, cultures, experiences or knowledge systems, as expressed in their dynamic forms, past and present.

Examples include:

  • projects in which water samples are extracted from Indigenous lands in South America
  • analyses of educational policies pertaining to Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians
  • cross-sectional studies of how injuries sustained by different groups of people, including Inuit youth, are treated

Promoting equity, diversity and inclusion

Sex and Gender Based Analysis Plus (SGBA+) is the process by which we ensure sound equity, diversity and inclusion principles are applied to research design, methods, analysis and interpretation, and/or dissemination of research findings. In the context of research, SGBA+ is an analytical process used to systematically examine how differences in identity factors, such as sex, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age and mental or physical disability, affect the outcomes of research and the impacts of research findings. The purpose is to promote rigorous research that considers identity factors so that the results are impactful and relevant to the diversity of the Canadian population. Applicants must provide a strong rationale if they believe that no aspect of the proposed research’s design, methods, analysis and interpretation, and/or dissemination of findings should take SGBA+ into consideration.

Referees are encouraged to take the Status of Women Canada’s online Introduction to Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) course.

There is an increasing number of cited research examples that would have or have benefited from considering identity factors in the research design and process. A good source for such examples is CIHR’s “Impacts of integrating sex and gender in research” and the Stanford University Gendered Innovations project. These materials provide practical examples and methods for sex and gender considerations, in addition to other factors or variables that should be considered, such as biological, socio-cultural or psychological aspects of users, communities, customers, experimental subjects or cells. Research has demonstrated how not taking into consideration certain identity factors, such as race or age, can lead to failed research projects.

Resources

For Reviewers and Readers

Reducing unconscious bias

Research respectfully involving and engaging Indigenous communities

Note: Research respectfully involving Indigenous communities is defined as research in any field or discipline that is:

  • conducted by First Nations, Inuit, Métis or other Indigenous nations, communities, societies or individuals; and/or
  • grounded in or engaged with one or more of these communities and/or their wisdom, cultures, experiences or knowledge systems, as expressed in their dynamic forms, past and present.

Examples include:

  • projects in which water samples are extracted from Indigenous lands in South America
  • analyses of educational policies pertaining to Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians
  • cross-sectional studies of how injuries sustained by different groups of people, including Inuit youth, are treated

Promoting equity, diversity and inclusion

Sex and Gender Based Analysis Plus (SGBA+) is the process by which we ensure sound equity, diversity and inclusion principles are applied to research design, methods, analysis and interpretation, and/or dissemination of research findings. In the context of research, SGBA+ is an analytical process used to systematically examine how differences in identity factors, such as sex, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, age and mental or physical disability, affect the outcomes of research and the impacts of research findings. The purpose is to promote rigorous research that considers identity factors so that the results are impactful and relevant to the diversity of the Canadian population. Applicants must provide a strong rationale if they believe that no aspect of the proposed research’s design, methods, analysis and interpretation, and/or dissemination of findings should take SGBA+ into consideration.

Reviewers and readers are strongly encouraged to take the Status of Women Canada’s online Introduction to Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) course.

There is an increasing number of cited research examples that would have or have benefited from considering identity factors in the research design and process. A good source for such examples is CIHR’s “Impacts of integrating sex and gender in research” and the Stanford University Gendered Innovations project. These materials provide practical examples and methods for sex and gender considerations, in addition to other factors or variables that should be considered, such as biological, socio-cultural or psychological aspects of users, communities, customers, experimental subjects or cells. Research has demonstrated how not taking into consideration certain identity factors, such as race or age, can lead to failed research projects.

Resources

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